2018 Guide to Spokane Open Mics

A couple years ago, I wrote a post about open mics in the Spokane area.  It has since been one of my most popular post.  So, I decided to write a newer one!  I will list all the mics that happen in the Spokane area, and I will comment on the ones I have attended.  Lets get into it.

Monday:

Red Room LoungeSign ups are at 8:30 and it starts at 9.  This is a mixed mic.

 

Tuesday:

The BartlettCheck website to make sure if they are going to have one.  Mainly a musical mic, but they will let you up…if you can do PG-13 rated comedy.

T’s LoungeSign ups start at 7pm with the show beginning at 8pm.

 

Wednesday:

Spokane Comedy Club:  Sign ups start at 7, but a line starts forming around 6:20, so if you really want to get on the list, you should be there around 6:30 and plan something to do after you get your name on the list.  The show starts at 8pm.  This is one of the biggest mics in the area, and for good reason, this is the club for the Spokane area.  Expect a list of around 20-25 comedians, with most doing three and a half minutes.  This is a very easy mic to do because there isn’t a much animosity as with a lot of other open mics.  So, if it is your first time, this may be the place for you because it is very welcoming.  There is usually a pretty good audience…for an open mic.  Expect to see some oddities, as will happen at most mics at a large club, but overall it is a great place to perform.

Geno’s Pizza8pm until midnight sign ups throughout show

Soulful SoupsSecond and last Wednesday of the month 10pm.  I have never performed here, but I have sat and watched.  This is a mixed mic, and it leans very heavy towards music, so don’t expect a hushed crowd when you walk up to sling your dick jokes.  You could be a featured performer for the night and get some soup.  I heard it’s very good.

 

Thursday:

Red Dragon:  Sign up at 6:30 for a 7pm show.  This is not the one downtown, but the one in the Hillyard neighborhood.

The DistrictSign up starts at around 7:30 for a 8pm (ish) start time.  2.0 open mic is what it’s called, and it was the newest open mic until T’s came around.  Hosted by the myth Ken McComb, it is a great room to do a longer set, but don’t expect a lot of people in the audience.  It is sparsely attended, and that could be because the place is only open for about three or four days out of the week.  Those that do wander in will usually sit further back in the room so it will still seem as though only the comedians are paying attention.  I like this room because you can work on longer bits that you can’t at Spokane Comedy Club.

Neato BurritoSign ups start around 9:30 with the show starting at around 10.  This mic is right down the street from The district so if you still have some comedy in you, you should stop in.  Casey Strain is the host and this has become the longest running open mic in all the land.  Attendance seems to be in waves.  You never know how many people will be in there when you get up.  You can perform a longer set here, but the audience is a little more tight than other mics in the area.  It used to be much worse, but now going up and doing your thing isn’t as bad.  I like that it is a later mic so you tend to see more of the night life roaming around Spokane.  Also grab a burrito and a drink.

 

Friday:

Red Dragon:  Sign ups at 7:30pm with a 8pm showtime.  Other than the Spokane Comedy Club, this is the second most attended mic in terms of audience.  They may not be the audience you want, but they are the audience you get.  Darryl Burns host the show, and for the most part things are pretty smooth.  This was not how it was years ago.  It was the wild west of open mics when it first started.  It was not unheard of for someone to get cursed out while they were on stage…or worse!  Now, if you can handle a little noise from the people frustrated that they can’t play pool, or the “whispers” of a former pimp in the corner, then this can be a great mic.

 

Saturday:

Nothing

 

Sunday:

The Ridler Piano Bar:  8pm showtime.  This is more of a showcase than an open mic, but if you are feeling it, just give Deece Casillas a holler.  This is a great place to do comedy, and there is usually a good audience.  Because it’s a showcase, however, don’t expect to get a lot of time because then you get in the way of booked performers.

 

There are all the open mics in Spokane.  A couple may be missing because I either thought they were too heavy on music or I just don’t know about it.  Thanks to Ryan McComb  for the help in putting this together.  Now get out there and get your funny on!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Moving to a Larger Comedy Market

Spokane is rarely the last destination for a comedian.  Historically, comedians discovered that they love comedy here and then go somewhere else to actually try to make a go at it.  Recently, we have had an exodus of sorts, and it got me thinking about things that comedians need to take note of before moving to a larger market.  This is not to discourage anyone.  This is to try to help those that are in smaller markets make the right choice so they can succeed in their new cities.

Can you find a job?: This seems like something of a no-brainer, but I have seen comedians leave the place they started comedy, get to the new city and realize they can’t find a job.  If you can’t get the basics covered, how are you going to pursue your comedy career.  This may be easier for those that have a profession, or a degree in a certain field, but if you don’t you may want to make sure you can get a job.

Do you have money?: I have read articles where they say have three months of savings just in case you can’t find a job that fast.  I will say, you may need 4-6 months if you are going from a lower cost of living area to a higher cost of living area.  If you saved based on Spokane’s rent market, but you are moving to LA, that three months savings is now only about a month and a half.  The cost of living in some of these cities are one of the reasons a lot of people abandon comedy.  It is hard to pursue comedy, when you have to work all the time.

Got a place to stay?: You may want to check and make sure your married high school buddy (and their partner) are cool with you sleeping on the floor of their nursery for a bit.  You don’t want to get to a new city and learn that your living arrangements went from “house” to “not a house”.  If you are moving in with roommates, try to see if they are not going to be moving out anytime soon.  That way you do not get to a new city and now you have to find new roommates so you can afford to stay in that place.

Are you a piece of shit?:  If you are lazy in your smaller market, you are not all of a sudden gonna work hard to make comedy work.  Comedians are rarely realistic about what they are willing to put into stuff.  It’s easy to fall into that trap as well.  If you live in a small town it may just be easier to be on shows because there are not that many comedians to begin with.  You can not take that approach when moving to a larger area.  Take LA for example.  You can’t throw an old timey mic without hitting a comedian.  If you are not writing, and showing up and networking, you will not see any success.  If you are a piece of shit.  You will not become a saint all of a sudden!  This is the internet age.  Your baggage goes with you.  If a booker in a new city wants to know about you, they probably know someone that knows someone that knows you.

Moving to a new place is exciting and can open all sorts of doors, but only if you are prepared and willing to fight for it.  The best will always surface, and a larger city helps those surface sooner.  Just make sure you are ready when your time comes to shine.

How Social Media Changed Comedy Promotion

When I first got started in comedy, the most popular social media network by far was MySpace.  In my opinion, Myspace wasn’t built for promoting your services and events, but people made it work.  Some of the best examples of this are Dane Cook and Kevin Hart.  They became huge names in comedy using social media and now everyone thinks this can happen to them.  The problem with that however is what I will coin the “ground floor effect” That is when a new service  or platform comes out, the ones on the ground floor have an easier time making a name for themselves on the platform and when it gets flooded with people trying to duplicate what made the first few successful, it doesn’t work as well.  So when Cook and Hart got huge from promoting on MySpace everyone thought they could do it.  This has lead to a lot of promotion solely on social media and a lot of assumptions made because of a lot of our misunderstandings of how people operate.  I will go through some of those in this article.

Let’s talk about the good first.  Social media has made it so any comedian can get the word out about an event in seconds.  You can also target groups of people.  Want all of your followers in Indiana to know you are coming through?  Done!  Don’t want your ex to know you will be in town Thursday?  Done! You can potentially save money on flyers by not having to print them out.  You can have your flyer guy make it up and you can throw it up on your favorite social media site and all those people (minus your ex) can see the event.  It can be a better solution then taping flyers to poles and hoping people will see them.  There is also an extra layer of engagement when you can talk to people interested in your show.  You can also do more as far as promoting because you can add video and chats and all this stuff to drum up excitement about your event.

Ok.  Now that I have talked about what makes social media a good thing for comedians, I want to now discuss why it is bad…well, not bad, but has changed the way we promote and get the word out about shows.  I think because it is easier than ever to tell many people about our shows, we have a tendency to lay off on the duty of promoting.  Here is an example:  We put on a monthly show that involves at least 12 comedians.  Every month nothing happens in way of promotion until the last couple of days before the show (if that).  There are a couple of things at work here.  First, is the bystander effect.  That is when there are so many people involved in something that they all assume that someone else will do the work.  What usually happens instead is no one really gets the word out, and then everyone is saddened that no one is at their show.  The other thing is that because someone is going to be promoting the show, the other comedians just assume that is enough.  It usually isn’t.

Comedians also make weird assumptions about the people they are promoting to on social media.  They create an event and then count the number of people that said they were coming as a sold ticket.  NO!  You can’t do that.  Until that person has bought a ticket, or sat their ass in a chair, they should not be counted.  People will say they are coming and then anything can happen.  They don’t have a babysitter, they are broke, they have violent diarrhea, or they could just be lying to make you feel better.  I have talked to many comedians putting on their own shows and they will say the same thing when it is ten minutes to show time and only seven people in the audience: “70 people said they were coming to the show!” Well, you know about 70 liars.  If you post your flyer on a social media platform and it gets 100 likes or hearts or whatever the hell they are doing, that doesn’t mean those are anything other than likes or whatnot. Those are not people coming to the show!  Even if your post about your event reaches 10,000 people it doesn’t mean a single soul is coming to the show.  It means that maybe 10,000 people saw your thing about that thing.

Comedians also tend to assume that people are just waiting to go to comedy shows.  Maybe, but you have to assume that your comedy show is on the bottom of their list of entertainment choices.  This is not the 1980s or 1990s.  There are a myriad of other things people can do.  They can watch TV, listen to podcast, play video games, and if they are going out, there are many movies, concerts, and other events that you are now competing with, so it is silly to assume that they will choose you over all that if the first time they found out about your thing is the day before.  You have to give people a chance to choose your event over all the other things they can be doing instead.  That is why a flyer is important, but also why making sure as many people as possible know about it by putting it out there as much as possible (without being annoying of course).

I am not a promotion guru.  I experiment with how to get the word out about a show as much as anyone at my level.  You have to understand the market in which you are working.  If you are in Seattle, it may be a tough sell to put on a show at the same time the Seahawks are playing.  You may have a hard time selling a show that happens at 8pm on July 4th.  You have to do more than just make a flyer and put it up at the place of business and post it on your social media platform of choice.  People get flooded with ads constantly from all angles.  Legit companies, bands, movie studios, and also local services.  You have to be persistent in this day and age to get your event seen. It is tough, but if done correctly, you can maybe end up like Dane Cook or Kevin Hart…or at the least have enough money to get an Lyft home.

Controlling an Audience

Controlling an audience is one of the key things a comedian has to do in able to be successful on stage.  Controlling, in the way we are going to be using the word, means to get and maintain the attention of the audience.  You would think this is very simple, but it is a skill that many comedians do not pick up. The best comedians on earth all possess this ability to more or less keep every audience member transfixed on them.  We will talk about a couple of ways comedians keep the audience listening.

I am of the belief that you, as the performer, should not have to tell the audience to pay attention.  You are the performer, not a grade school teacher.  On the other hand, I think it is up to bar staff and especially the MC to set a list of guidelines before the show starts.  The MC should be making sure that they have wrangled any rowdy tables and has gotten the entire room on the same page.  That is why you have the MC!  They go up and deal with the headaches and put out the fires so the show can go smoothly once she steps off stage.  Now, that isn’t to say every MC is good at doing this.  I have performed with Hosts that will invite talking, but never tell the audience that the rest of the comedians may not be into that.

So, you are now on stage.  How do you control the crowd?  Well, it seems simple, but you would be surprised by how many comedians can not get an audience that paid to see them quiet.  Some comedians have never really done loud and hostile environments like sports bars or a room that is just generally disinterested, so when the audience isn’t paying attention or into what they are doing, they tend to strike out at the audience and things only get worse from there.  A tried and true technique is to tell the audience to give it up for the host or the previous comedian.  The audience will start clapping and that gives you enough time to do a couple of things (if you weren’t paying attention earlier).  First, you can scout real quick and see the tables or places in the room that are being disruptive to the show.  If they are in the back of the room, sometimes it is best to let them be if you can’t pull them in with the people that are paying attention.  Why?  Because if you focus your time on them then you are ignoring the people that are paying attention and that can lead to a room of folks not liking you.  Second, if you don’t have a planned first joke, it gives you time to throw out something that will instantly get the crowd on your side.  I have seen everything from a quick one-liner to a quick call back to a previous joke.  This is to get them focused on your performance.

Another method is to just get up and with your voice get the room’s attention.  Nothing says you are now performing like getting the mic really close to your face and filling the room with your voice.  This may not work for you though if the rest of your set is you being meek up on stage.  You can also start with a strong joke that will immediately get the crowd listening to what else you have to say.  It could also be that your mere presence makes the audience want to hear what you are talking about.   If you are a white person in a room filled with people of color, they may just listen long enough to see if you are going to make them laugh.  This will be your chance to get them on your side.  If you are a comedian of color, and the room is mostly white, getting on stage and immediately saying the n-word may not be a good thing.  I am not saying don’t do your act, but if you are trying to make sure the room is paying attention you want them to be on your side long enough for them to follow you down any nook and cranny you wish.

Some comedians are just gifted.  They can get on stage and within twenty seconds have the audience eating out the palm of their hands.  Not all of us have that ability, so I hope the tips above will give you a little bit of an edge the next time you are trying to get the room under control.  Make sure you are not screaming at the audience to shut up and things of that nature.  That isn’t your job.  Get the staff or security to handle that.  If you have to keep everyone in check then you should be getting paid for comedy as well as security.  If nothing else is working just find that one table or group that is paying attention and play to them.  Guess what?  Most of the time, if you get a group paying attention to you they will tell the rest of the room to shut up and listen!  I think next time we will talk about when we as comedians should be the bad guy on stage.

Don’t Go “Cheap” With Your Comedy Career

A lot of us are not making bank with our comedy careers.  That does not mean, however, that you shouldn’t seek out quality when you are getting promotional materials made.  Technology has made it that we can do a lot of stuff ourselves.  We can design posters, shoot head shots and film and edit videos for submission.  Well, I am here to tell you that going cheap will make you look cheap in the eyes of those that are booking you.

Lets talk about posters first.  It may seem like all you need is Photoshop and pictures of who is going to be on the show, and BAM! Poster.  Designing posters is an art form in itself!  Do you know the techniques it takes to make an appealing poster?  Are you just making a wall of text with a couple of tiny, blurred photos?  These are things to take into account!  I like to make my own posters, but not because I am cheap, but because I like to do stuff like that.  The problem is that I am not that good at designing something appealing to people that are jaded with advertising as it is.  So, if it is an important show, I like to make sure someone that is well versed in creating posters creates mine so it looks as good as possible.

Comedians just starting out don’t realize how important head shots are.  They are the first thing bookers, promoters, and your potential audience will see of your face.  What people fail to understand is that there is a difference between a head shot and other types of photos of your head and neck.  If you are on stage performing when the photo was taken then that is considered more of a candid photo.  You may not want to lead with that for many reasons.  The light may not have been the best so you look like you have a triple chin.  One of your eyes were slightly closed when the photo was taken so you look like a knock off Pop-eye.  You should be getting your head shot as soon as you think you want to make money doing comedy.  It doesn’t have to be in a studio, but you do want it to be a structured environment so the photographer can get the best version of you on the sensor that they can.  You also want to get them redone every couple of years or when you change something significant about your face (beard, no beard nose ring, face tattoo).  I take head shots so whenever I talk about this I have to make sure that I say I don’t care who you go to for your head shots.  I care that you take good head shots because bookers get tons of emails with a ton of promotional material and the last thing you want is for them to ignore you because you had your friend take a photo of your head with their iphone.

A lot of comedians just starting out also tend to forget another important part of your promotional materials and that is the video.  I have a couple of articles that you can read about why video is important.  I have seen comedians ask if anyone has a camera to film their set.  If you are using it to send to bookers (as opposed to just uploading it to YouTube), then you should be asking more questions.  Do they have a decent camera?  You want something that can take good video in low light.  Do they have a lens that can record you cleanly on stage?  If they are in the back of the room with a 35mm lens or an iphone, you will look tiny and promoters don’t want to see a bunch of silhouettes and your tiny ass up on stage.  You want someone that can get you from roughly the waist up.  Do they have the ability to get good sound?  Do they have a way to either get the sound from the soundboard or are they using just the camera’s mic?  If they are just using the mic on the camera, then you are gonna get everything AND your set.  That is distracting!  Are they gonna color correct the video or just give you what came off the card?  This is where it pays to pay someone some money to film you! If you look like a smurf because the white balance was off that tells the booker that you most likely just sat a camera in the back of the room and hit record, so you aren’t really trying that hard to get work.

Here is the thing.  I learned all these lessons the hard way.  My first head shots were taken by my girlfriend at the time.  She didn’t know anything about photography.  We just took them around Eastern Washington University and sent them to bookers.  I would set my camcorder up in the back of the room and send that video to comedy clubs.  It would be all dark and I was so far away that you could tell I just sat it and forgot it.  I didn’t get a lot of work because I was trying to go as cheap as possible.  Now, it is worth it to me to pay someone to design a poster or my t-shirt.  I charge comedians to record their sets and take their head shots. The thing is, I did not go to school for this stuff, so I encourage them to seek out someone else if they are not happy with the results I provide.  If you want to make a go at comedy, give it a good go, and don’t go cheap!

 

Why Stage Time is Important

I see this a lot.  A comedian will get their 20-25 minutes or maybe they will get a solid 45 minute set, and then you never see them unless they are getting paid to perform.  Then, more often then not, you watch them struggle on stage and they blame everything, but the most obvious:  You are lacking stage time! Stage time is more then just getting up on stage and working towards new material or sharpening old stuff.  I look at stage time like athletes look at practice.  You go over the stuff you plan to do so when you are in a real situation it comes out more natural.

Getting up on stage regularly helps “knock the cobwebs” off of material.  Sometimes you have a joke that you are really comfortable with, and so you stop performing it at open mics.  Then, you get on a stage during a show and try it out and you lose your place and forget where certain parts go into the joke as a whole, this can be diminished with trying that joke every so often.  Here is something I do:  Every so often, when I’m at an open mic, I will just do material that I haven’t done in a while, but I really want to keep in my set.  That keeps it fresh in my mind so when I do want to use that material in a show, I am not lost.

Stage time also keeps that “comedic edge” about you.  Comedic edge is the ability to make the funny seem natural.  The best comedians in the world keep their comedic edge easier because they work more often then comedians that only get a couple shows a month.  They are able to control the room because they are so confident in the material and where it is going.  This is important for all comedians, especially those of us that play in bars a lot.  You need that edge to keep the crowd on your side.  If you are fumbling around, how are you gonna convince the audience to keep listening to you?

I get it.  Comedy can be a drain sometimes.  You are out at open mics for hours for three minutes of time.  If you get a guest set, you have to drive down to a club and pay for parking and all of that, but if comedy is important to you as an art form and as a means of income, then you owe it not only to yourself, but also the audience that paid to see you.  Don’t you want to be the best comedian you can?

 

Dealing with Depression As a Comedian

I have been dealing with depression since my military days, and it has taken me many years and many ups and downs, to come to terms with it and live with it effectively.  My strategies and experiences will differ from many of course.  All I am trying to do is give insight into how I deal with this and how it has, and continues to affect, my comedy.

What some people get wrong about depression is that they think that the only way to feel depressed is to have either a rotten life or something bad happen.  Most of the time, for me at least, it just hits.  I will be doing well, and then all of a sudden a curtain comes down and I don’t feel as well as I did.  Sometimes I will go to bed happy as hell, and I will wake up feeling miserable and not wanting to get out of bed.  Things that I had planned I just sort of push to the side and even things that I like to do (like photography and video games) I will forgo so I can just curl up.  Its not just feelings though.  Sometimes I will be more tired than I usually am.  I will go to bed earlier and stay in bed later.  As you can see this can have an effect on a comedian.

Don’t get me wrong, depression can make any profession tough to pursue, but comedy is a crazy one because everything else is always moving.  Here is an analogy:  If you have been to an airport, they have those conveyor belt like things on the floor that will just take you down the walkway.  Well, that is most comedians.  They are doing shows, and networking and pushing to get more shows and get more recognition.  Then you have the people that are just walking normally.  Those are the hobbyist or the slackers.  They are moving, just much slower.  Then you have the person curled up in the middle of all this.  Using their luggage as a really uncomfortable pillow.  That is how I feel.  Depression can creep into every aspect of your comedy career.  It makes you not want to chase the club spots because your mind is flooded with thoughts of what’s the use.  It makes you not keep up with opportunities that most people would gobble up.  Projects get delayed or outright canned.  And that is before you have written a joke!  Depression can affect your comedy on stage in a variety of ways.  It may sap your confidence to try that new joke.  It can keep you from really selling a joke to make sure it works, or it can keep you from even getting out to work on your material all together.

Over the years, I have come up with ways (with help from professionals of course) to deal with my depression.  One of the biggest things I try to do is when that cloud finally lifts, I make sure I get as much done as possible.  I do this because I know that cloud will come back and hold back my progress, and since I don’t know when it will hit again, I have to make sure I get stuff taken care of.  That means once I feel better I hit up all these bookers and promoters and I contact people that are doing stuff and I try to book myself up.  That way I don’t fall into an even deeper depression when I am down and on top of that, I have no shows on the calendar because of it.  I try to keep things consistent in my life.  So, I try to hit a couple of open mics a week and stick to it, so when I am down it is such a habit I can barely break from it (I do more often leave earlier when I am depressed then when I am not though).  I try to talk to, and hang out with, people that bring positive vibes in my life.  So, my kid and my girlfriend, and a couple comedians that always make me laugh (I don’t want to say their names because the ones that don’t will probably feel bad). When I am depressed and I have a show, I try to stick with jokes that even depression can’t convince me isn’t funny.  I had a show this past week and just getting up on stage kind of pumped me with enough feel good juice that I forgot about everything for an hour.  That maybe why I have stuck with comedy for as long as I have because when I am feeling down, I can get on stage and turn my thoughts into jokes and it gets the adrenaline pumping (because I don’t know if it will work or not) to the point that I feel a bit better.

All I can do is tell you what I do to combat depression in my life.  One thing I don’t do is use alcohol and drugs, so I can’t tell you what that will do, but I do have friends that it has negatively affected.  Look into anti-depressants and try to have a network of people that give a shit about you.  Comedy is my drug, and even depression can keep me from pursuing that fully.  It has affected my career.  It has kept me from traveling and networking as much as I should.  It keeps me from applying to things that could help my career.  Only when I am feeling better do I look and see the opportunities missed because of it. This blog has been affected by depression (that is why sometimes you will see a surge in articles from time to time).  I have to live with this as best as I can, and at the same time be the best comedian I can be.  It is hard, but with the right tools anyone can get through it.